Articles tagged with "Brain Health"


  • Move Your Body – Love Your Brain

    How does simply moving around affect the brain? For the past several years I’ve been doing my best to get out the information that shows how aerobic exercise benefits the brain by increasing the growth of new brain cells, as well as reducing the risk for brain degeneration. However, it looks like most adults are not achieving the 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity/week recommended by the 2018 US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Physical Activity Guidelines. In fact, this level of physical activity is only achieved by 57% of adults aged 40-49, and a paltry 26% of those aged 60-69. That said, researchers recently set about exploring whether simply moving around would have a beneficial impact on brain health. They designed a study of 2,354 participants (with an average age of 53) that ran for three years. The subjects wore an accelerometer that basically determined Read More

  • Even Mild Exercise Helps the Brain

    An important part of my lectures over the past several years has been to emphasize how our lifestyle choices, around things like sleep, diet, and exercise, will ultimately impact the destiny of our brains. For example, we have long been discussing how exercising today relates to a healthy brain in the future, especially its association with reduced risk for dementia. Now, new data is revealing that exercise not only has long-term benefits for brain health, but even more acute changes are being discovered that are clearly positive. In their recent publication in the journal PNAS, Japanese researchers, with the accepted premise that physical exercise does benefit how the brain works, wanted to determine some specifics about just how much exercise is required for it to positively impact the brain. Their human research utilized some very sophisticated, high-resolution MRI brain scanning techniques that are able to delineate the functionality of the brain’s Read More

  • Ketosis Increases Antioxidant Activity

    The science surrounding the ketogenic diet expands day by day. In today’s video I will explore some of the science that shows a relationship between the ketogenic diet and increased brain glutathione levels, and explain why that matters for brain health. The full study can be found here. Want to learn more about the ketogenic diet? Then consider checking out my e-guide to this incredibly powerful dietary and lifestyle choice. Source

  • The Empowering Neurologist – David Perlmutter, MD, and Dr. Sara Gottfried

    Brain Body Diet is the newest book written by New York Times best-selling author, Dr. Sara Gottfried. Dr. Gottfried writes about the uniqueness of the female brain as it relates to physical body issues, such as weight loss, as well as psychological issues like anxiety, happiness, and mindfulness. It’s a deep dive into a vast array of lifestyle opportunities that can absolutely rewrite a woman’s health destiny. Brain Body Diet is an incredibly empowering work and I can assure you that you will find this interview to be very meaningful. I am honored that I have been given the opportunity to write the foreword for Dr. Gottfried‘s new book as well as permission to reprint it below. Take a read, and then enjoy today’s discussion. One of the most exciting developments in the area of health and wellness over the past decade has been the recognition that gaining an understanding of a person’s uniqueness opens the door Read More

  • Benefits of Probiotics for your Mood, Gut, and Immune System

    By: The Dr. Perlmutter Team One of the most exciting developments in lifestyle science over the last decade has been the sharpening focus on the central role that our resident microbes (bacteria) play in regulating overall health. These microbes, together with their genetic material and metabolic byproducts make up what is collectively known as the microbiome. It is becoming readily apparent that the trillions of microbes living on and within us play a fundamental role in almost all of the systems of the body. Even as recently as 10-20 years ago, we did not understand the extent to which the gut microbiome can influence a person’s mood, regulate appetite, produce essential vitamins, regulate the immune system, and influence systemic inflammation. There is even evidence to suggest that the microbiome affects us on such a fundamental level that it can regulate the expression of our DNA! This growing body of science Read More

  • Vitamin D and Alzheimer’s Disease: Could Deficiency Increase Your Risk?

    You know, we’ve explored, several times now, the relationship between vitamin D levels and risks for severe health complications, including dementia. Notably, my colleague Dr. Dale Bredesen has written and researched much on this topic, particularly with regard to the relationship between vitamin D levels and Alzheimer’s risk. In fact, Dr. Bredesen even includes vitamin D supplementation in his protocol for treating Alzheimer’s and dementia. Well, a new study in the journal Neurology explores the scientific fact behind this relationship between vitamin D, and dementia and Alzheimer’s. This longitudinal study followed 1,000+ elderly individuals who were free of dementia at the outset, to see how their vitamin D levels and brain health state changed over time. Here’s what they found. Source

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