Articles tagged with "inflammation"


  • Your Alzheimer’s Prevention Program – Start Today!

    David Perlmutter M.D. – Empowering Neurologist: The food, the facts, the science to control your genetic destiny. It’s relatively straightforward – the best time to do something about fending off Alzheimer’s disease and dementia is well before you start to experience warning signs of cognitive decline. As has been well-documented on this blog before, inflammation in your 20s, 30s, 40s…really, at any stage in life, has been associated with increasing your risk for Alzheimer’s disease, a disease for which there is no cure. As we’ve been preparing and launching our docuseries on Alzheimer’s, Alzheimer’s: The Science of Prevention, I’ve been reminded of the importance of this, and the relationship between Alzheimer’s and inflammation, thanks to the information shared by the experts taking part in this series. So today I want to review some recent science that shows just how powerful that relationship has been revealed to be. The post Your Read More

  • Announcing Brain Wash

    David Perlmutter M.D. – Empowering Neurologist: The food, the facts, the science to control your genetic destiny. Look around and ask yourself, could things be better? We believe the answer is a resounding yes. And this is our ultimate goal in bringing out our new book, Brain Wash. Brain Wash is a functional roadmap for understanding how so much of what characterizes our modern world influences our brains and, most importantly, our decision-making. From our modern diets to our lack of restorative sleep to our virtual addiction to our digital experiences, the trappings of modern times actually conspire to keep us unfulfilled, impulsive, and self-centered. Brain Wash begins by bringing these powerful influences into stark reality. We present a framework for appreciating the negative impact of these exposures, and then provide a set of practical interventions for reclaiming our brains and improving our physical and mental health.  We’re all taking part in Read More

  • How Belly Fat Threatens the Brain

    Body fat. Even the phrase can be scary. But for the purposes of today’s video, we need to change the way we talk about body fat. Body fat is more than a storage depot of calories for the winter. In fact, body fat is a powerful source of chemical factors that can cause inflammation in the body. When we remember that inflammation can act as a harbinger of chronic diseases, like Alzheimer’s and diabetes, it shed a light on why it is so crucially important for us to think about body fat beyond just mass and energy. In today’s video, I want to examine a study, recently published in Neurology, that looks at body fat, it’s place in the body, and what that means for the health of the brain. Source

  • Diabetes Risk and Impulsivity

    Understanding the relationship between less healthful dietary and lifestyle choices and developing type-2 diabetes, a recent study linking the brain’s center for impulsive behavior and diabetes risk was really interesting. The research was performed at the Massachusetts General Hospital and involved 232 non-diabetic subjects. These individuals underwent brain-imaging studies that measured the metabolic activity of their amygdalas, an area of the brain that is involved with fear, stress, and impulsivity. Researchers demonstrated that individuals with an amygdala that showed higher activity were much more likely to later develop diabetes. This risk seemed to be independent of obesity. Even the risk for insulin resistance, the harbinger for diabetes, also correlated with increased activity in the amygdala. There are a lot of interesting ideas that this relationship brings to mind. First, the amygdala is activated by stress. Stress also increases the level of cortisol hormone in the blood, which may then go Read More

  • Diabetes Risk and Impulsivity

    Understanding the relationship between less healthful dietary and lifestyle choices and developing type-2 diabetes, a recent study linking the brain’s center for impulsive behavior and diabetes risk was really interesting. The research was performed at the Massachusetts General Hospital and involved 232 non-diabetic subjects. These individuals underwent brain-imaging studies that measured the metabolic activity of their amygdalas, an area of the brain that is involved with fear, stress, and impulsivity. Researchers demonstrated that individuals with an amygdala that showed higher activity were much more likely to later develop diabetes. This risk seemed to be independent of obesity. Even the risk for insulin resistance, the harbinger for diabetes, also correlated with increased activity in the amygdala. There are a lot of interesting ideas that this relationship brings to mind. First, the amygdala is activated by stress. Stress also increases the level of cortisol hormone in the blood, which may then go Read More

  • Grain-Fed vs Grass-Fed and Finished Beef — Why Does it Matter?

    By the Dr. Perlmutter Team Americans eat a lot of meat. In 2018, the United States Department of Agriculture projected that the average person would consume over two hundred pounds of chicken, pork, and beef by year’s end. That’s more than half a pound daily per capita, every day of the year! While it is possible to consume an omnivorous diet and maintain a healthy lifestyle, we recommend viewing meat as a garnish or side dish rather than the focus of your meal. The perfect plate is full of colorful, above-ground leafy vegetables and healthy fats, with a three-to-four ounce serving of meat. Furthermore, should you choose to consume meat, it’s very important to remember that not all meat is created equally. One of the most important factors in determining the overall quality of meat—especially red meat—is the dietary patterns of the livestock that produced it. When you think about Read More

  • Benefits of Probiotics for your Mood, Gut, and Immune System

    By: The Dr. Perlmutter Team One of the most exciting developments in lifestyle science over the last decade has been the sharpening focus on the central role that our resident microbes (bacteria) play in regulating overall health. These microbes, together with their genetic material and metabolic byproducts make up what is collectively known as the microbiome. It is becoming readily apparent that the trillions of microbes living on and within us play a fundamental role in almost all of the systems of the body. Even as recently as 10-20 years ago, we did not understand the extent to which the gut microbiome can influence a person’s mood, regulate appetite, produce essential vitamins, regulate the immune system, and influence systemic inflammation. There is even evidence to suggest that the microbiome affects us on such a fundamental level that it can regulate the expression of our DNA! This growing body of science Read More

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